Erik Lundegaard’s Ticket-Stub History of the ’95 Mariners

A few days ago Erik Lundegaard, who you might recognize as a long-time Seattle writer on the Mariners and many other subjects, contacted me about the ticket-stub history of the ’90s Mariners he was doing. He’s chronicled the Kingdome games he went to from 1993 to 1999. Erik explained that in 1993, “I began keeping my ticket stubs and writing on the back not just the final score but any significant events that occurred during the game. Randy Johnson strikes out 15 Royals. Jay Buhner hits for the cycle. Things like that. The impetus for this reportage–I can now admit–was to keep track of how many Ken Griffey Jr. homeruns I had seen.” 

He wound up agreeing to let me repost his memories of some of the ’95 games he went to, and they’re provided below, but you can go here to read his account of all the games he attended in 1995.

  • May 30: M’s 7, Yankees 3: Down 3-2 in the 8th, with 2 outs and a man on third, the M’s string together a walk, single, walk, single, hit-by-pitch and a single, and score five times to win it. Derek Jeter, playing in only his second game in the Majors, bats ninth for the Yankees and goes 2-3 with a walk. They’re the first two hits of his Major League career. They’re the first two runs scored of his Major League career. I still have that ticket if some Yankees fan wants to buy it. Bidding starts at $10,000. M’s: 18-13, 1 1/2 GB
  • June 28: A’s 7, M’s 5: Bobby Ayala Goatee Night: surely one of the worst promotional ideas ever. I forget what you get if you show up with a goatee, but I show up without one and get to see a loss. Randy leaves the game in the 7th with a 5-2 lead but with the bases loaded and one out. Bill Risley promptly gives up two singles to tie the game. In the next inning, Jeff Nelson gives up two HRs, including Mark McGwire’s second of the game, and the M’s lose. Ayala and his goatee never enter the game. 29-29, 5 GB
  • September 12: M’s 14, Twins 3: The M’s hit four homers; Buhner hits two of them. Were the M’s feeling loose? We were in the stands. In the bottom of the 7th, after a solo homer (by Buhner) and a 3-run homer (by Dan Wilson) put the M’s ahead 14-3, Lou sends up pinch-hitters Alex Diaz (for Vince Coleman) and Arquimedez Pozo (for Joey Cora). It’s the latter’s Major League debut. When they announce him I tell Mike and Tim, “That may be the greatest baseball name ever.” It isn’t just the grand, Greekish first name. Any two- or three-syllable name ending in “o” is a great baseball name, because they’re so easy to chant. When I was a kid in Minnesota we used to chant “Let’s go, Tony-O,” for Tony Oliva all the time. And in the late 1970s, a player named Jesus Manuel Rivera became a fan favorite because his nickname was “Bombo,” and every time he was at the plate Twins fans would chant, “Bom-bo, Bom-bo.” At the Kingdome I demonstrate. I begin chanting, “Po-zo, Po-zo, Po-zo,” and Mike and Tim join in, and people around us join in, and then our section joins in, and suddenly the entire stadium, 12,000 strong, is chanting for this kid and his Major League debut. I wouldn’t be surprised if others began their own chants in their own sections, and we all met somewhere in the middle, but the overall effect is still magical. Pozo pops out to second but we cheer him anyway as he returns to the dugout. We’re loose. It’s his only at-bat of the season. M’s: 66-62, still 6 GB.
  • September 22: M’s 10, A’s 7. Fan Appreciation Night, and the fans, 51,000 strong, suddenly fill the joint. (From this moment on, I won’t be at a game with fewer than 30,000 fans for YEARS.) But after 3 innings the M’s are down 6-0. Bel-CHER! In the bottom of the 4th, though, Junior leads off with a homer. 6-1. With two outs and a man on, Mike Blowers doubles. 6-2. Luis Sojo walks. A miracle. Dan Wilson singles to load the bases. Just when I’m thinking, “Hey, tying run at the plate,” Vince Coleman hits a ball that squeaks over the right-field wall. “Get out the rye bread and mustard, Grandma! It’s Grand Salami time!” Bedlam. 6-6. Oakland retakes the lead in the 7th, but in the bottom of the 8th Edgar leads off with a HR to tie it, followed by single, sacrifice bunt (by Buhner?), and walk. Two on and Sojo up. But no! Piniella pinch-hits with Alex Diaz. Is he CRAZY? Sojo’s been hot. I’m still cursing Lou when Diaz smokes one into the left field bleachers. 10-7. Fan Appreciation Night, indeed. The M’s, at 73-63, are in sole possession of first place.
  • October 17, Game 6 of the 1995 ALCS: Indians 4, M’s 0: Once again, the M’s face an elimination game. And once again, Lou goes to Randy on short rest. It turns out to be one short rest too many. The Indians get to him in the 5th on an error (by Cora) and a single. 1-0. But my chief memory is Kenny Lofton in the 8th inning. Tony Pena leads off with a double and Lofton, attempting to advance him, bunts his way on, then steals second. Pitching to Omar Vizquel, my Omar, the ball gets away from Dan Wilson. Pena scores. And when Randy’s not paying attention, Lofton scores ALL THE WAY FROM SECOND. Carlos Baerga’s homerun is the swing that finally chases Randy, but it’s Lofton’s baserunning that really did us in. In the last three innings, only one Mariner reaches base: Tino, with a walk, in the bottom of the 9th with two outs. Brings up Jay Buhner. His grounder to third ends the game, the series, the magic season. But the fans, including me, don’t want it to end. Half an hour after the game ends, we’re all still there, cheering for the M’s…who return onto the field and acknowledge the crowd with tears in their eyes. Series: 2-4, Cleveland.
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    4 thoughts on “Erik Lundegaard’s Ticket-Stub History of the ’95 Mariners

    1. Gawd..enough already. Its 2010! Let us all move forward and leave 95 in 95.

      Yes, it saved baseball in Seatown. Yes, it was the greatest year of professional baseball this town has ever been part of.
      Yes, I have my own fond memories of that awesome season.

      But its 2010!

      Enough already..

    2. RE- 12 Sept Game vs. Minn

      Dude, you have it wrong. The “pozo” chant started about 5 rows in back of 3rd base. I know I started it with a fellow NY transplant. Of the 100 or so games I have seen on both coasts that is the most memorable for many reasons. Even got myself playoff seats that year. A great season that saved baseball in Seattle.

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